Trump’s travel ban ‘unprecedented,’ says Senate immigration committee chair

Trump’s travel ban ‘unprecedented,’ says Senate immigration committee chair

NEW YORK — President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed an executive order that will temporarily ban travelers from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States and imposes travel restrictions on seven other Muslim-majority nations.

The order, which was filed late Wednesday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, requires the Department of Homeland Security to submit a report to Congress on the impact of the order and is set to take effect on March 16.

The White House says that since the order was signed, it has reduced the number of people who have entered the U: 2,400 people.

However, the order does not contain any provisions that would bar those from coming into the country.

It also does not prohibit entry to the U for citizens of Iran, Libya or Somalia who are nationals of those countries or for citizens from any of the other seven countries subject to the order.

The president’s executive order, as outlined by DHS, is an attempt to limit access to certain parts of the U, including airports, ports, borders and the Internet.

The executive order includes several provisions to limit entry to certain religious minorities.

The U.N. refugee agency said on Wednesday that the executive order was intended to “address the significant threats posed by the proliferation of extremism and violent extremism.”

The agency said that its staff is reviewing the executive orders.

Trump also signed a measure that would temporarily suspend the U and suspend entry to citizens of Sudan, Somalia and Syria for 90 days, and impose sanctions on all individuals and entities linked to those countries who provide support for or provide material support to the Government of Syria or designated foreign terrorist organizations.

The bill also suspends the ability of the Government and any individual or entity involved in the procurement of materials that support such support for any individual, entity or organization.

Trump signed the measure in the Roosevelt Room of the White House.

Trump said he was signing the bill to get rid of “bad” people, not to stop people from coming in.

He did not specify whom the bad people would be, other than to say that it would target terrorists.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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